First 2 Months

Ten little fingers, ten perfect toes, fill our hearts with love that overflows.

1st Month

Your Baby's First Month

  • Is full of cuddling, sleeping and feeding as their bodies adjust to the outside world.
  • The time you spend nurturing them will help their brain grow and develop as they start to experience the world.
  • At 1 month, most of what babies do is still caused by natural reflexes.
  • When a baby is born, their head will weigh one-quarter of their weight.
  • Some babies can raise their heads a little at birth, towards the end of the first month, most babies can raise their head during tummy time and turn their head to one side.
  • They will also start to focus with both eyes and should be able to follow a moving object.

My 1 Month Old

Infant development begins at birth. Initially your baby will grow fast and learn a lot. At 1 month, cuddling, sleeping and feeding are all that really matter to your baby. The time you spend with them will help their brain grow and develop as they start to experience the world.

Your baby will probably be crying a lot. It’s often because they’re hungry or have a dirty nappy, but often babies just cry for no apparent reason. Give them lots of cuddles to comfort them, and remember that the crying will eventually pass.

At 6 to 8 weeks, your baby needs a full health review by a health professional such as child and family health nurse, midwife, GP or paediatrician.

My Baby’s Growth

Babies grow at different rates. On average, at 1 month they gain between 0.7 to 0.9kg each month and grow 2.5 to 4cm. Their head circumference will increase by about 1.25cm each month.

Babies lose weight right after they are born. Healthy babies usually get back to their birth weight in the first 2 weeks and will then continue to grow. A baby loses up to 10% of their birth weight in the first week and regains this by 2 weeks.

Your baby was weighed at birth and your doctor or maternal child health nurse will plot their growth regularly on a growth chart. Babies come in all different shapes and sizes, and your baby might be large or small. What matters is that they grow consistently over time.

Try not to compare your baby’s weight gain with that of other babies.

What Can My Baby Do?

Physical Development

At 1 month, most of what babies do is still caused by reflexes. They aren’t thinking about their actions. They will be sucking, swallowing, searching for milk and grasping objects placed in the palm of their hands (although most of the time they’ll keep their hands clenched in tight little fists). They will also step one foot in front of the other if you put their feet on a flat surface. If they fall backward, they will throw their arms and legs out, blink their eyes and breathe faster.

By the end of the first month, most babies can raise their head when you lay them on their stomach, and they will turn their head to one side. As their neck muscles get stronger, they will be able to turn their head and lift it up when they’re in a car seat or carrier.

 

Cognitive Development

They will start to focus with both eyes at 1 month and should be able to follow a moving object with their eyes.

 

Social Development

They will probably prefer looking at a human face to looking at an object. They will gaze deeply into your eyes if you hold them about 45cm away from your face. Most babies can recognise their parents by this age.

1 month old babies love the sound of your voice, but they will get startled if they hear a loud noise.

 

Emotional Development

Your baby will cry loudly when they are hungry or uncomfortable. When they are happy and content, they might make little gurgling noises. Respond to your baby’s sounds by gurgling and cooing back can be comforting for baby.

At 1 month, some babies will be learning how to soothe themselves, with a dummy or even by sucking their fingers or thumbs. Helping your baby to suck is a good way to calm them down.

How Can I Help My Baby Develop?

Spend time with your baby whenever you can. Looking deep into their eyes and smiling at them will help them to bond and to feel safe and secure.

Read and sing to your baby. Even though they can’t understand, they will enjoy hearing your voice. Music helps to stimulate their senses and will keep them amused. Playing with them will also strengthen your bond. Massage, and baby reflexology are great for baby’s health and strengthening your bond.

Help your baby to develop neck strength by putting them on their tummy for 1 to 5 minutes at a time. This is called tummy time. Always keep an eye on your baby during tummy time and always put them to sleep on their back.

Development Problem Signs

Babies develop at different rates. At 1 month, you will still be learning about your baby and their needs. But talk to your doctor or maternal child health nurse if:

  • they aren’t feeding well,
  • they are regularly sleeping a lot more than 16 hours a day,
  • they aren’t moving their arms or legs,
  • they aren’t following your face with their eyes or responding when they see you,
  • they don’t startle or seem not to be hearing things,
  • you are worried about your baby’s crying or sleeping.

Sources:

The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne (Clinical Practice Guidelines – Unsettled or crying babies)Australian Government (Developmental milestones and the Early Years Learning Framework and the National Quality Standards)Royal Children’s Hospital (Tummy Time for your bay)Starting Blocks (Your child’s Development – birth to 4 months)Australian Breastfeeding Association (What’s normal with weight gains?) https://www.pregnancybirthbaby.org.au (Pregnancy birth baby)

Friendship session and Health Benefits 1 month and 2 Month old, First aid program
Baby Sensory with foil streamers 1 month and 2 month old

2nd Months

“A mother’s arms are made of tenderness and children sleep soundly in them.” —Victor Hugo

Your Baby's 2nd Months

  • You may have noticed your little new born is growing very quickly.
  • By 2 months, your baby might be lifting their head and moving it from side to side.
  • At this age, your baby will enjoy looking at your face and will be giving you some very cute smiles that will melt your heart.
  • Your baby will be able to follow you with their eyes as well as be able to track a moving object past the midline.
  • At 6 to 8 weeks, your baby will have their scheduled vaccinations — 3 injections and the oral rotavirus vaccine.

My 2 Month Old

By 2 months, your baby will have put on a lot of weight and may be looking round and chubby. As their muscles develop, their arms and legs start to move more freely, stretching out to make them seem taller and leaner.

During their first 2 months, your baby is growing very quickly. They will keep growing at this rate, probably gaining about 900g and growing 2.5cm to 3.8cm every month.

Babies often have a growth spurt at about 6 weeks. This might make them fussier because they want to eat more than usual. It might feel like you’re feeding all the time, especially at certain times of the day. You can sometimes tell your baby is hungry if they’re sticking their tongue out or sucking. If they doze off or turn their head away, they’re probably full.

At 6 to 8 weeks, your baby will have their scheduled vaccinations — 3 injections and the oral rotavirus vaccine.

What Can My Baby Do?

Physical Development

By 2 months, your baby will have discovered their fingers and hands. They will hold their hands open and grab an object (although they don’t know how to let go yet). They might also clasp both hands together.

2 month old babies will start to learn how to coordinate their movements. Instead of the jerky arm and leg movements they made when they were born, they can move more smoothly and in more of a circular motion. They will kick both legs strongly and will be very wriggly. They may even roll over (though this usually occurs later), so don’t leave them alone on a area they can roll off like the change table.

Their neck will be getting stronger all the time. During tummy time they might be lifting their head and moving it from side to side. Some babies can even lift their chest off the ground by now.

 

 

Social Development

Some (though very few) babies can sleep through the night by the time they reach 2 months. But even if you’re not one of the lucky parents or carers, your baby might at least be sleeping for longer stretches at a time. They’ll probably be having 2 to 4 long sleeps and will be more awake and alert during the day — although babies’ sleep patterns still vary widely at this age.
Your baby will also clearly recognise you and will look at you when you talk to them. They will enjoy looking at your face and will be giving you some lovely smiles.

 

 

Cognitive Development

Your baby will be able to follow you with their eyes as well as be able to track a moving object past the midline. They will like looking at objects with more complex patterns and colours.

 

Language Development

Your baby will also be making a lot more sounds and gurgling, including sounds like ‘a’ or ‘o’, and they will seem to listen to you and talk back to you.

How Can I Help My Baby Develop?

As your baby develops more of a daily rhythm, you’ll find they are awake more during the day. This gives you more time to interact with them and help them develop. Spend plenty of time reading to them, singing, and talking. That way they’ll get used to sounds and words and will start to develop language and communication skills.

You can play with them by letting them look at and feel a variety of objects with different designs, colours, and shapes. Plastic toys and soft balls work well.

They will love looking at you, so make sure you smile at them a lot. It releases ‘feel-good’ chemicals in your baby’s body and helps them to feel safe and secure. You could also give your baby a massage to relax them. After a bath is a good time.

Continue with 1 to 5 minutes of regular tummy time to strengthen their neck and upper body. It will help them develop the muscles they’ll need later to sit and crawl. Make a sensory pillow to encourage tummy time.

Development problem signs

Babies develop at different rates. At 2 months, talk to your doctor or maternal child health nurse if:

  • they aren’t smiling by 8 weeks,
  • they don’t calm down, even for a little while, when you pick them up to comfort them,
  • one side of their body seems to be stronger than the other,
  • they’re still continuously holding their fingers in a tight fist or are floppy or stiff,
  • sudden noises don’t startle them,
  • they aren’t feeding properly.

Sources:

Victorian Government (Check you are using the correct vaccine for age)Royal Children’s Hospital (Tummy Time for your bay)Australian Government (Developmental milestones and the Early Years Learning Framework and the National Quality Standards)Australian Breastfeeding Association (What\u2019s normal with weight gains?)Starting Blocks (Your child’s Development – birth to 4 months)

Lots of Advice

Sometimes all the advice you receive may be a little over whelming and contradicting. 

Just remember you can’t please everyone, and you are the parent or caregiver who knows your baby the best.

You Are Doing a Fantastic Job